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Define Your Denver

Organized by Denver City Council in CO


Every 10 years Denver City Council is required to redraw its council boundaries through a process called redistricting. While we await the release of the census data we want to know how you define spaces and communities that are important to you. We will be using the information you submit in this mapping drive to inform our initial redistricting maps.

This organization has partnered with Representable to allow people to draw communities of interest and share information about the interests and needs in those communities.

Making this information available encourages mapmakers to take these communities into account during redistricting, in order to avoid gerrymandering and the “packing and cracking” of marginalized groups.

In 2021, voting district lines across the country will be redrawn to determine who represents the people of your state.
Denver City Council is conducting a mapping drive throughout the summer and fall to understand how community defines itself through Representable.org. Representable.org is an anti-gerrymandering project based out of Princeton University. Communities will have the opportunity to draw maps online defining their boundaries, and answer a series of short questions. City Council staff will analyze these maps and the short-answered responses to draw preliminary council boundaries based on community feedback.
Representable will help you tell mapmakers about your community interests and boundaries, so that they can fairly consider it when they draw new voting district lines.
In Denver the goal of redistricting is to create eleven districts that are as evenly-populated and as geographically compact and reasonable as possible to uphold the one-person-one-vote standard in the US Constitution. Sec. 3.1.2 of the Charter provides guidance for redistricting. The Charter requires Denver to have eleven districts; that districts to be as compact as possible; that districts contain contiguous territory; that districts contain as equal a population as practical based on the most recent US census data; that districts consist of whole voting precincts; and that district boundaries be changed at least once every ten years.
Communities of Interest in Denver
Our state constitution defines a community of interest as, “any group” that “shares one or more substantial interests that may be the subject of federal legislative action." We want to know how you define your community. Is your community a shared language? Culture? Faith? Or is it simply somewhere you love. We want to learn about your neighborhood, community, and important spaces to inform maps that help communities stay together.